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Opiates (OPI 300 and 2000)

“Opiates” refers to any drug that is derived from the opium poppy, including the natural products morphine and codeine, and semi-synthetic drugs such as heroin. The term “opioid” is more general, referring to any drug that acts on the opioid receptor. Opioid analgesics comprise a large group of substances that control pain by depressing the central nervous system. Large doses of morphine can produce higher tolerance levels, physiological dependency in users, and may lead to substance abuse. Morphine is excreted unmetabolized, and is also the major metabolic product of codeine and heroin. Morphine is detectable in the urine for several days after an opiate dose.


Drug Abuse Recognition (DAR)

As a point of reference, the following objective symptoms: Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus, Vertical Gaze Nystagmus, Lack of Convergence, Pulse, Romberg Stand, Pupil Size, and Pupillary Reaction To Light are determined during a DAR evaluation to identify drug influence and impairment. The following objective symptoms of someone under the influence of opiates may be used as a reference only, and should not be used to replace certified Drug Abuse Recognition Training.

Please contact Express Diagnostics if you would like more information on DAR-OS or drug abuse recognition training.

Opiates: Buprenorphine, opiates, methadone, oxycodone, tramadol, fentanyl

Horizontal Gaze NystagmusNot Present
Vertical Gaze NystagmusNot Present
Lack of ConvergenceNot Present
PulseSlow
Romberg StandSlow
Pupil SizeConstricted
Pupillary Reaction To LightSlow

Source: Graves & Associates